Michel Sauvage, FSC

ABSTRACT

In sixteenth-century Italy and seventeenth-century France, there emerged a relative abundance of male and female congregations devoted to instruction of youth. The author explores the emergence of and spiritual differentiation among what would become known as “teaching orders” in the traditions of Saints Augustine, Benedict, Francis de Sales, Ignatius, and many others. The influence of Catholic and Lutheran reformations is explored; formation and community practices are described; and the spiritual foundations of educational and pastoral ministries are compared. An earlier version of this article was published in the Dictionnaire de Spiritualite (Dictionary of Spirituality), Vol. XI.

FULL TEXT

The Origin and Spirituality of Teaching Orders in the Church

About the Author

Michel Sauvage, FSC, S.T.D.

Brother Michel Sauvage, FSC (1923-2001) did his doctoral thesis in Lille (Catéchèse et Laïcat, 1963), was a professor at the Lateran Pontifical University in Rome (Jesus Magister Institute), and was theologian for his brother (Bishop Jean Sauvage) at the Second Vatican Council. From 1966 to 1976, he was Assistant Superior General for Formation of the Brothers of the Christian Schools. In addition, he served as the second director of the office of Lasallian Studies in the Generalate in Rome.

ISSN: 2151-2515
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